Eagle Rub Foods  

Subtitle

Eagle Rub Smoked Ham

Ingredients:

1 spiral cut cured ham

Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning

Sweet Honey Mustard

2 cups of brown sugar

About 1.5 cups of pineapple juice

2 tbsp honey

Heavy duty foil

Foil pan

 

Pick up a cured spiral cut bone in ham at the grocery store. These hams are usually sugar cured and hickory smoked. They are already fully cooked. What we are doing is "double smoking" them and bringing them up to temp for serving. If you smoke a fresh ham that is uncured (these are not typically in most grocery stores) they usually end up tasting like pulled pork. So, make sure you get one that is already cured and fully cooked for this recipe. I like Hormel Cure 81 spiral cut bone in hams. There are numerous other great brands out there. I like buying several of these during the Christmas season when they are on sale and freeze them. Take your thawed ham out of the package and place the cut side down in a foil pan. Rub a even coat of the sweet honey mustard all over the ham. Shake on Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning all over the ham. It will stick to the mustard. Sprinkle a generous amount of brown sugar all over the ham also. Pour 1/2 cup of water into the pan. This helps make steam and keeps the ham moist. Set up your smoker indirect at 230 degrees. Add some of your favorite wood for smoke. I like pecan, oak, apple, cherry, or mesquite. Place your ham in the foil pan in your smoker for 4hrs. After 4hrs brush or spray the ham with about 1/2 cup of pineapple juice. Leave the juice that is already in the pan. Cover with heavy duty foil and put back in the smoker at 230 degrees for another 2hrs. After 2hrs bring your ham inside and drain all of the juice from the pan. Either carefully take the ham out with a large spatula and drain or scoop out the juice. This juice will be to smokey to use for basting the ham or anything else. Place the ham back in the pan, or a new one if you want. In a saucepan combine 1 cup of brown sugar, 2 tbsp honey and slowly add some pineapple juice until you make a thick glaze while cooking over medium low heat. Do not allow to boil. This will only take about 15 minutes. Set your oven to 425 degrees. I then brush the glaze all over the ham. Bake the ham at 425 degrees for 10 minutes. The glaze will begin to bubble and turn into a chewy candy like glaze. Take out the ham and allow to rest for about 10 minutes (nice time to take pictures of it!). Take the ham out of the pan, lay it on it's side and the spiral cuts will be falling off. Happy Easter, Happy Thanksgiving or Merry Christmas!

 

 

Eagle Rub Brisket

Ingredients:

1 whole (packer cut) brisket or trimmed "flat" brisket

¾  cup apple juice

1 beef bouillon cube

Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning 

Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce

Heavy duty foil (never use regular foil when smoking)

 

I like to use whole briskets (packer cut). A whole brisket is the “flat” and “point” still together. The flat is where the sliced brisket comes from and the point is what you chop up to make sandwiches. The “flat” is very lean and the “point” has more fat throughout it. Briskets are also sold as “flats” only. These are very nice cuts but always cost about a dollar or so more per pound. Whole briskets are always your best value. The whole brisket will have a large fat cap on the bottom. Trim this fat and leave about ¼ to ½ inch across the bottom. Briskets sold as “flats” only are usually already trimmed so there is usually no need to do any trimming. Completely cover both sides of the brisket liberally with Eagle Rub. I like to do all of this on a large sheet of heavy duty foil. If time permits, set your brisket back in the refrigerator for a couple of hours and let the Eagle Rub start marinating the brisket. If you don’t have time for this, it is no big deal. Set your smoker up for an indirect cook. Stabilize your temperature at 230 degrees. If your smoker falls to 200 or rises to 250 or so during the cook, don't worry about it. It may just take a little longer or less time to cook. To many people stress out if their smoker is not set at a specific temp the whole cook. Add your favorite wood chunks for smoke. I like using oak, pecan, hickory, apple, or mesquite for all of my beef and pork cooks. Now put the brisket into the smoker, fat side up. This allows the fat to cook through the meat. This keeps the meat moist during the cook and gives it incredible flavor! Smoke the brisket until you reach an internal temperature of 190 to 195 degrees. For an 8 to 14 pound brisket, it will take approximately 12 to 14 hours at 230 degrees. Each brisket is different so the time will vary. The main thing to remember is to leave it alone and let it cook! There is a stage during the cooking process of a brisket where the internal temperature will stay between 155 and 170 degrees for approximately 4 hours. This is the “plateau stage”. During this time the fat in the brisket is breaking down and beginning to melt. Do not up your temperature in an attempt to push it through this stage. Cooking a brisket is a slow process. When your brisket reaches an internal temperature of 190 to 195 degrees it is time to take it off. Before doing this, heat up ¾ cup of apple juice to boiling in the microwave. Add 1 beef bouillon cube and 2 teaspoons of Eagle Rub to the juice and stir together until dissolved. Take your brisket out of the smoker and place it on a large sheet of heavy foil, still fat side up. Fold up the edges. Now poor ½ to ¾ cup of the apple juice mixture over the brisket. Seal the brisket with the foil and wrap it again in a second sheet of foil. Adding this juice to your brisket will re-hydrate it. Now place the double foil wrapped brisket on the towel and wrap it up. Do not turn it upside down because the juice will leak out. Now place the brisket inside an empty ice chest (no ice - you are using it to hold heat). This is called letting the brisket “rest”. I like to leave my briskets in the ice chest for 3 to 5 hours. It is during this time that the brisket will start to get very tender. If you are more than 5 hours away from when you need to cut and serve the brisket after you reach 190 or 195 degrees or you don't have an ice chest you can also use your oven (DO NOT USE A TOWEL IF USING OVEN). Set your oven to warm or the lowest setting you have. Most ovens will go as low as 170 degrees. If you are using an oven and maintaining a steady temperature, you can leave it in up to 8hrs or more. After 3 to 5 hours (or longer if using an oven to hold it) take the brisket out and unwrap. Fold one side of the foil down to make a spout and pour the juice into a cup to save. You are now ready to slice the brisket. Place the brisket meat side up (fat down). Start slicing it against the grain of the meat. It is very important to slice it against the grain. Trim the fat from the slices if you desire. Slice the entire “flat”. After slicing all of the “flat”, pour the juice that you saved over the sliced brisket. Cut up the “point” into chunks and chop up. Serve with Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce. Enjoy!

 

Eagle Rub Pulled Pork

Ingredients:

1 whole Boston Pork Butt

Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning

Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce

Heavy duty foil (never use regular foil when smoking)

The Boston Pork Butt is one of my favorite cuts of meat to smoke. It requires very little preparation and makes a ton of usable meat (most of the fat will cook away during the low and slow smoke). Boston Pork Butts are sold in a variety of sizes, ranging from around 7 to 12 pounds. Take the pork butt out of the package and cover the entire piece of meat liberally with Eagle Rub. Set your smoker up for an indirect cook. Stabilize your temperature at 230 degrees. If your smoker falls to 200 or rises to 250 or so during the cook, don't worry about it. It may just take a little longer or less time to cook. To many people stress out if their smoker is not set at a specific temp the whole cook. Add your favorite wood chunks for smoke. I like using oak, pecan, hickory, apple, or mesquite for all of my beef and pork cooks. A combination of any of these is also very nice. If time permits, set your pork back in the refrigerator for a couple of hours and let the Eagle Rub start marinating it. If you don’t have time for this, it is no big deal. Now put the pork butt into the smoker, fat cap side down. I smoke pork butts fat cap down because their is already a significant amount of fat throughout this cut of meat. If you can't smoke it fat cap side down due to room in your smoker, no big deal. Smoke the pork butt until you reach an internal temperature of 190 to 200 degrees. For a 7 to 12 pound pork butt, it will take approximately 10 to 16 hours at 230 degrees. Each pork butt is different so the time will vary. The main thing to remember is to leave it alone and let it cook! There is a stage during the cooking process of a pork butt where the internal temperature will stay between 155 and 170 degrees for approximately 4 hours. This is the “plateau stage”. During this time the fat in the pork butt is breaking down and beginning to melt. Do not up your temperature in an attempt to push it through this stage. Cooking a pork butt is a slow process. When your pork butt reaches an internal temperature of 190 to 200 degrees it is time to take it off. Wrap the pork butt up in two layers of heavy duty foil and wrap with a towel. Now place the pork butt inside an empty ice chest (no ice - you are using it to hold heat). I like to let it “rest” in the cooler for 3 to 5 hrs. If you are more than 5 hours away from when you need to chop and serve after you reach 190 or 200 degrees or you don't have a ice chest you can also use your oven (DO NOT USE A TOWEL IF USING OVEN). Set your oven to warm or the lowest setting you have. Most ovens will go as low as 170 degrees. If you are using an oven and maintaining a steady temperature, you can leave it in up to 8hrs or more. After 3 to 5 hours (or longer if using an oven to hold it) take the pork out and unwrap. I do not save any of the juice from the foil because a pork butt is already very tender. It should be so tender that it really will pull apart. If it has a bone inside, it should slide right away. There should be little to no trimming of fat needed. The fat cap on the bottom is the only fatty part that should be left after the cook. You will be surprised how much meat you get from this cook. Serve with Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce. Enjoy!

Eagle Rub Ribs

Ingredients:

Whole slabs of baby back or spare ribs

Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning

Apple juice

Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce

Heavy duty foil (never use regular foil when smoking)

 

I like using baby back ribs. Start by laying your rack of ribs meaty side down on a large cutting board. On the inside of every rack of ribs there is a membrane. It is very important to tear this membrane off in order to achieve very tender ribs. With a sharp knife, start pulling up this membrane on the corner of the longest rib bone. It is very slippery. With a paper towel get a hold of the started end and began pulling. The membrane should start pulling off; it may come off in two or three pieces. You may think there is more membrane on the rack but as long as you get this first layer off, you’re fine. Cover both sides of the rack with a generous coat of Eagle Rub. I like doing these first steps and letting the ribs then set in the fridge for about 3 hours. If you don’t have time that is ok. Set up your smoker for an indirect cook at about 250 degrees. Add your choice of wood to the coals for smoke. I like using oak, pecan, hickory, apple, or mesquite for all of my beef and pork cooks. Put the ribs into the smoker in a vertical rack if possible. There are several types of vertical rib racks on the market. Check at your local bbq store or hardware store. You can also lay them meaty side down if you do not have a rack. For baby back ribs cook for 3 hours, for spare ribs cook for 4 hours. After 3 or 4 hours, take the ribs off. Place each rack in two layers of heavy duty foil (never use regular foil – it tears too easily) meaty side down. Add about 4 tablespoons of apple juice over the ribs in the foil. Cover them up good and place them laying flat (no horizontal rack) back into the smoker at 250 degrees for another 2 hours. You can stack them on top of each other if you need to. After 2 hours take the racks off the smoker and wrap in a towel. Place them inside an empty ice chest (no ice - you are using it to hold heat). I like to let them “rest” in the cooler for about 1 hour. If you don't have a ice chest you can also use your oven (DO NOT USE A TOWEL IF USING OVEN). Set your oven to warm or the lowest setting you have. Most ovens will go as low as 170 degrees. It is during this time that they are going to get very tender. If you like a “crispy” texture to your ribs set up your grill for direct heat at about 350 degrees (medium-high). Lay the rack directly on the grid and cook for about 5 minutes per side; you can even brush with BBQ sauce during this time if you like your ribs that way. Serve with Eagle Rub BBQ Sauce. Enjoy!

Eagle Rub Smoked Turkey

Injection marinade:

1 pd of real butter

12 ounces apple juice

1 tbsp Eagle Rub All Purpose Seasoning

1 tbsp paprika

1 tbsp fine ground black pepper

1 tbsp salt

1 tbsp garlic powder

1 tbsp onion powder

1 tbsp dry yellow mustard

1 tsp cayenne pepper

Make sure your whole turkey or whole bone in breast is thawed and washed. Do not forget to take out the giblet pack and neck from the inside of the turkey. Now make your marinade: Melt the butter on the stove in a medium size saucepan. Add the apple juice and all of the remaining ingredients. Stir it very well on low for about three minutes. The night before you plan to cook your turkey inject it all over with the marinade. I like to simply set my turkey in a large foil pan that will still fit in my smoker while I inject it. Make sure you stir up the marinade each time you fill your injector. You do not have to use all of your marinade, it depends on how big your turkey is. Now rub the entire outside of the turkey with a light coat of olive oil. Completely cover the whole turkey with a coat of Eagle Rub. I also toss some Eagle Rub inside the cavity of the turkey. I then return the turkey to the fridge and let it marinate all night. If you don't have time for this, it is ok. Set up your smoker for indirect heat at 300 degrees. I use a combination of apple and pecan for the smoke on birds. These woods will not over smoke poultry. They will produce a mild, more fruity smoke taste. Cooking it in the foil pan makes hardly no mess and it is very easy to remove from your smoker when it is done cooking. I cook the turkey for 12 to 15 minutes per pound and like the breast meat to get up to 175 degrees. When it is done I take it out and cover it with a large piece of heavy duty foil. I let it set for 30 minutes before carving. After carving I like to baste the pieces with the juice in the pan. Enjoy! Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas!

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